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Prepared Physician’s Pearl of Wisdom for January 2021 Poking where?

Prepared Physician’s Pearl of Wisdom for January 2021 Poking where? 0

When loved ones suffer the onslaught of relentless fluid loss from any cause, the need for intravenous rehydration will quickly arise.


With the quandaries of quarantine confounding easy access to health care, a prepared physician can provide treatment at home with ease and efficiency using our IV hydration kits!


For intravenous access in the upper extremity, the metacarpal and dorsal veins comfortably allow access with 22-20 gauge IV catheters. Accessing these veins still allows functional mobility of the arm while IV access is in place.

For short term IV access, when extremity mobility is not a concern, access of the more proximal cephalic, medial cubital, or basilic veins is appropriate. These veins can accommodate IV catheters sized 22-16 gauge. 

Roberts, JA et al. Clinical Procedures in Emergency Medicine and Acute Care, 2019; 395-396.

Prepared Physician’s IV hydration kits come with 22, 20, and 18 gauge IV catheters, so you are prepared for any scenario.


Check out Prepared Physician’s great options for IV Hydration Kits and be prepared for any illness to strike!


Nathan Whitaker, MD

Prepared Physician

Provider Prepared's Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom #35 Mental Nerve how to

Provider Prepared's Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom #35 Mental Nerve how to 0

For facial wounds located in the lower lip, inferior to the lower lip, and chin area a mental nerve block is appropriate for anesthesia.

The mental nerve exits the mental foramen within the mandible. It is located in line with the infraorbital and supraorbital foramen. We prefer using the intraoral approach for this nerve block.

Palpate the mental foramen, using a 25 or 27 gauge needle, insert the needle just medial to the mental foramen, directed toward the foramen at the inferior gum line. If the patient experiences any paresthesia withdraw the needle until the symptoms resolve. Inject 2mL of anesthetic into this location. With wounds that are near the midline, a bilateral block will need to be performed to achieve sufficient anesthesia.

 Hollander, JU et al. Assessment and management of facial lacerations. UpToDate November 2017.

Provider Prepared Laceration Repair Kits with Lidocaine will have you prepared at home and on the go for facial laceration anesthesia and repair!

Provider Prepared

Nathan Whittaker, MD

  • Brandon Durfee
Provider Prepared's Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom # 34 Infraorbital how to

Provider Prepared's Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom # 34 Infraorbital how to 0

For anesthesia of the medial cheek, lateral nose, upper lip and lower eye lid, infraorbital nerve block is appropriate. We recommend the intra-oral approach for infraorbital nerve blocks.

Landmarks for the nerve block are: the second bicuspid, the pupil with a straight forward gaze and the inferior bony otrbit notch. The infraorbital foramen is located in the mid portion of the zygomatic arch, inline with these landmarks, and frequently can be palpated.

For an intraoral approach; insert a 27 or 25 gauge needle through the gum line, oriented in line with these landmarks at the second bicuspid, directed toward the infraorbital foramen. Keep a finger at the infraorbital foramen, when the pressure of the needle is palpated stop advancing the needle. If the patient develops paresthesia withdraw the needle a short distance until paresthesia resolves. Inject 1-2 mL of anesthestic in to this area.

Hollander, JU et al. Assessment and management of facial lacerations. UpToDate November 2017.

Provider Prepared Laceration Repair Kits with Lidocaine will have you prepared at home and on the go for facial laceration anesthesia and repair.

Provider Prepared

Nathan Whittaker, MD

  • Brandon Durfee
Provider Prepared's Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom #33 Facial Anesthesia

Provider Prepared's Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom #33 Facial Anesthesia 0

An important part of facial wound management is achieving appropriate anesthesia for wound repair. Injection of local anesthesia can cause distortion of the tissue, leading to increased difficulty in careful cosmetic repair.

Regional facial nerve blocks are a very useful alternative to local anesthesia. There are three facial nerve blocks that are frequently used for facial lacerations. Mental nerve block, infraorbital nerve block and supraorbital nerve block.

The Mental nerve block provides anesthesia for the lower lip, skin inferior to the lower lip and chin.

Infraorbital nerve blocks anesthetize the upper lip, lateral nose, lower eyelid and medial cheek.

The supraorbital nerve block is useful for anesthesia of the forehead and anterior scalp.

Hollander, JU et al. Assessment and management of facial lacerations. UpToDate November 2017.

Provider Prepared has lidocaine as an option for your Laceration Repair Kits! You can be prepared with all the tools of the trade at home or on the go.

Provider Prepared

Nathan Whittaker, MD

  • Brandon Durfee
Provider Prepared's Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom #32 Smashing!

Provider Prepared's Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom #32 Smashing! 0

A 50 year old male presents to the Emergency Department after smashing his left thumb with a sledge hammer. He has increasing pressure like pain associated with increasing subungual hematoma.

Pain associated with a subungual hematoma is caused by pressure building in a contained space between the nail bed and the nail plate.

Trephination is indicated for the relief of pressure and thus pain of a  subungual hematoma; when the injury is less than 24-48 hours old, is not draining spontaneously, and has intact nail folds. Trephination can be accomplished with electrocautery devices or with the boring technique using a needle. Use of a heated paperclip is discouraged, many paperclips are now made of materials that are not capable of retaining sufficient heat for trephination.                                           Fastle, RE et al. Subungual hematoma. UpToDate  December 2016.

Provider Prepared's Laceration Repair Kits come with a selection of needles that allow you to perform the boring technique at home. Check out our smashing options for honest and affordable wound care at home and on the go.

Provider Prepared

Nathan Whittaker, MD

 

  • Brandon Durfee
Provider Prepared’s Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom #31 Its Cheeky!

Provider Prepared’s Weekly Pearl of Wound Wisdom #31 Its Cheeky! 0

A 40 year old male presents to the emergency department for evaluation of a cheek laceration, which occurred when he was struck in the face by a piece of aluminum rain gutter while doing exterior finish work on a home he is building.  

As with all facial lacerations, cheek lacerations should have careful examination. When deep tissues of the cheek are involved, examination must include assessment for injury to the parotid gland, parotid duct and facial nerve.

The anatomy of the deep structures of the cheek must be understood for proper evaluation. The parotid gland and facial nerve branches are just anterior to the ear, they are also superficial to the masseter muscle. Since these structures are superficial to the masseter muscle, they can easily be involved in lacerations of the cheek. The parotid duct extends from the gland to the intra-oral mucosa with the opening adjacent to the second molar. Parotid duct injury must be considered when deep tissue laceration is present. Injury to these deep structures requires specialty consultation.

Hollander, JU et al. Assessment and management of facial lacerations. UpToDate November 2017.

This patient was found to have wound extension into the parotid gland, we subsequently  obtained consultation with our Maxilofacial Surgeon, who took the patient to the operating room.

Visit Provider Prepared for honest and affordable wound care at home and on the go!

Provider Prepared

Nathan Whittaker, MD

  • Brandon Durfee